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MuespachRam

Tour de France

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On ‎19‎/‎07‎/‎2018 at 15:47, SaintRam said:

I don't think I've ever watched any cycling. Never really understood it as something to be spectated. 

Pity that you probably didn't give it a go today.... you could of course watch the highlights on ITV4 at 19.00 this evening.

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I'm fully aware that cyling has a very dubious reputation regarding performance enhancing substances (I've read several books about it) and also how Brailsford demands a squeaky clean team,despite suspicions about Froome.

On the one hand Froome seems a rather shy, open character, on the other there's the old adage about smoke and fire.

So I'm rather surprised, nay, amazed, the 'G' has kept it going the whole tour. and how strong he's finished stages, especially that last mountain stage where he out-sprinted the other climbers. Also, to be only a few seconds behind Doumalin(sp) and Froome in the ITT was, well, a bit unexpected. Admittedly his time trialing has improved and he's had so much bad luck in previous tours, but you do have to ask yourself the obvious question.

It's also a bit odd that previous Sky 'lieutenants' who've nursed Froome up the mountains, and sometimes finished the stronger (Landa for one, I think), never really cut it in other teams.

I just really, really hope Thomas is squeaky clean but there's so much at stake with the teams/sposors, stuff comes to light later on. The laboratories who work on stuff to mask drugs seem to be harder at work than the ones producing them. And the lengths they can go to to avoid testing positive is an art form in it's own right. Read Tyler Hamilton's book 'The Secret Race', a real eye-opener.

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I really don't understand road cycling so maybe someone can explain:

1. What do they mean by "getting their team mates to help them out"? They can't pedal for them so I don't get what they mean. As a part b) why are they even organised into teams? 

2. Why has the Welsh bloke already won when it's still going on? Surely he could fall off and break his leg in the next 80km?

 

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10 minutes ago, JoetheRam said:

I really don't understand road cycling so maybe someone can explain:

1. What do they mean by "getting their team mates to help them out"? They can't pedal for them so I don't get what they mean. As a part b) why are they even organised into teams? 

2. Why has the Welsh bloke already won when it's still going on? Surely he could fall off and break his leg in the next 80km?

 

They move in front of their team mate so they can slip stream them. It's waaay easier to ride when you have somebody close in front.

Tradition dictates the final Sunday is a procession and it's frowned upon to attack.

 

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12 minutes ago, JoetheRam said:

I really don't understand road cycling so maybe someone can explain:

1. What do they mean by "getting their team mates to help them out"? They can't pedal for them so I don't get what they mean. As a part b) why are they even organised into teams? 

2. Why has the Welsh bloke already won when it's still going on? Surely he could fall off and break his leg in the next 80km?

 

And yeh he could fall off and break his leg, but as there are no attacks and it's a simple stage the chance of that happening is about the same as an F1 car spinning out of control and crashing on the warm up lap.

Even if he fell off, it's unacceptable to launch an attack on the back of an accident.

My guess is even with a broken leg he'd get there some how.

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8 minutes ago, Bob The Badger said:

And yeh he could fall off and break his leg, but as there are no attacks and it's a simple stage the chance of that happening is about the same as an F1 car spinning out of control and crashing on the warm up lap.

Even if he fell off, it's unacceptable to launch an attack on the back of an accident.

My guess is even with a broken leg he'd get there some how.

Thanks. I assumed it was something to do with slipstreaming but just thought the effect couldn't be great enough to make a difference.

So theoretically someone could try and beat him, but they don't bother because of tradition? Has anyone ever done it?

Edited by JoetheRam

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17 hours ago, MuespachRam said:

Amazing performance for the entire 3 weeks...!

one of the best sporting achievements ever..

sports personality of the year sewn up too.!! Ha ha 

I hope he wins sp just got to hope HK doesn’t get a foot in.😉🤣

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1 hour ago, JoetheRam said:

Thanks. I assumed it was something to do with slipstreaming but just thought the effect couldn't be great enough to make a difference.

So theoretically someone could try and beat him, but they don't bother because of tradition? Has anyone ever done it?

i don't think so. Tradition is important in the Tour.

Either last year or the year before the leader (can't remember if it was Froome or not - but could have been as it was in the mountains) came off.

One of the top few riders attacked immediately. It was tough to say if that was the reason or it was a coincidence, but his team caught him up, went past him as they would normally and then deliberately slowed the pace.

It does make the last day a bit boring unless you're a fan of a particular sprinter. Would have been interesting of Cavendish was till in and on form. 

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1 hour ago, JoetheRam said:

Thanks. I assumed it was something to do with slipstreaming but just thought the effect couldn't be great enough to make a difference.

So theoretically someone could try and beat him, but they don't bother because of tradition? Has anyone ever done it?

From Wikipedia, but it was a time trial.

In 1989, Greg LeMond beat Laurent Fignon by 58 seconds over a 24 km time trial from Versailles. In doing so, he closed a 50-second gap to win the 1989 Tour de France by eight seconds. It was the first (and only) time trial final stage on the Champs-Élysées

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Why not make cycling a team sport where the pair win, rather than the individual if it plays such a large part in who wins. Seems a bit unfair on the guy chafing away just to let his mate take all the plaudits.

Telling his grandkids how he was the slipstream man for Bradley Wiggins doesn't sound as great as actually winning the Tour De France.

In F1 if your team mate is around he can help hold up the pack, but Hamilton could still win the race with Bottas miles away.

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8 riders per team I think in the Tour.  In a way it would be a fairer sport if there were no teams.  As it stands members of stronger teams, with better riders to assist them in the team time trial or half way up a mountain, have a better chance of winning the tour than riders in weaker teams. 

Not to mention being a member of the team with the more sophisticated laboratory and team of doctors behind the scenes has, traditionally, had a huge bearing on the result of the Tour. 

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9 hours ago, David said:

Why not make cycling a team sport where the pair win, rather than the individual if it plays such a large part in who wins. Seems a bit unfair on the guy chafing away just to let his mate take all the plaudits.

Telling his grandkids how he was the slipstream man for Bradley Wiggins doesn't sound as great as actually winning the Tour De France.

In F1 if your team mate is around he can help hold up the pack, but Hamilton could still win the race with Bottas miles away.

The Tour winner traditionally does not take any winnings from the race, they are shared amongst the team.  G has just won the lottery BIG TIME. Racing events will pay big appearance money to have the TdeF race winner grace their event in the future. Domestiques and in G's case, Super Domestiques, can command high salaries for riding for the benefit of their team leader, and that is their function. G was in the form of his life this season and was clearly the better climber than Chris F, so being a Super Domestique could have created a problem - if having 1 and 2 in the General Classification during the latter stages of the race was a problem! Realistically, in any Grand Tour there are only perhaps half a dozen potential winners, so Sky having two "candidates"  in both 2012 and 2018 is remarkable.

The composition of the team evolves annually : it was no coincidence that Team Sky had no less than 4 climbers in their team, and as the penultimate stage demonstrated, they placed three riders in the top four of the individual time trial, both facets being essential to winning the event.

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When you cycle through the alps
Hold your head up high
And don't be afraid of the climb

At the end of a ride
There's a golden jersey
And the sweet silver song of a lark

Cycle on through the wind
Clycle on through the rain
Though your dreams be tossed and blown tyres

Cycle on, cycle on
With drugs in your body
And you'll never cycle alone

You'll never cycle alone

Cycle on, cycle on
With drugs in your heart
And you'll never cycle alone

You'll never cycle alone

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eddie
On 03/08/2018 at 12:42, David said:

When you cycle through the alps
Hold your head up high
And don't be afraid of the climb

At the end of a ride
There's a golden jersey
And the sweet silver song of a lark

Cycle on through the wind
Clycle on through the rain
Though your dreams be tossed and blown tyres

Cycle on, cycle on
With drugs in your body
And you'll never cycle alone

You'll never cycle alone

Cycle on, cycle on
With drugs in your heart
And you'll never cycle alone

You'll never cycle alone

Bike or ride instead of cycle and you would have a winner. Which would be a first for Grimsby.

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