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Carl Sagan

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  1. If your club doesn't want you and you have the chance to have your contract paid up through to the end so you can go to a team where you would be wanted, get game time, and get paid even more money on top, you'd be bonkers not to.
  2. It was shorthand for paying up their contracts and releasing them, which happens frequently in football. Which would free up numbers to allow new players to come in who would be starters. Obviously it's sickening to consider it, but if the EFL won't allow us to add numbers to the squad, the only option is to lose those players not contributing to make room for others who would. Brutal. But a lot needs to happen first before that can even be considered.
  3. All sounds good advice. It's wrong and very short-sighted that feed-in tariffs are a thing of the past. And ultimately it's because of the privatization of our energy. The future is going to be communities taking over their own power generation through local smart grids.
  4. Thanks for the run down. Presumably in this case it means for the foreseeable future at the club, Williams *cannot* sign a professional contract. Which has implications for him and the club. We don't quite have a hard 23 embargo right now. It's a hard 25 because of the injuries to Bielik and CKR, but they will be fit to play around the opening of the window and I don't see the EFL extending that anyone, meaning we'll lose Jagielka and Baldock unless we've sold at least 2 other players. My guess is Bielik and Jozwiak will be first to leave if administrators are still in place. January will come round quickly. Will it be clear at that point if the embargo will persist? If there is the possibility a hard embargo will last through summer 22 it means none of the U23s can play first team football so surely some such as Cashin and Thompson will look too move on. If we have new owners through the door and there's a chance of keeping us up, as you say Marshall, McDonald, JBrown, Watson and Hutchinson would all be likely have contracts terminated to bring in new players if we can, but the EFL is insisting on approving the business plan so likely will not let us buy, even if the money is there. It's such a mess.
  5. What are the implications for the Academy that none of the U23 team currently has any prospect of progressing to the first team? And I wonder at what stage does Dylan Williams cease to be eligible for matches? Will they be prepared to wait and bide their time, or are we expecting a mass exodus in January? My understanding from the EFL pronouncements is that they intend to do their darnedest to keep us under embargo until the end of next season, which would mean no one can come through until after then. It seems to me to be part of the EFL's plan to destroy the club by destroying the Academy pipeline.
  6. A terrible time for you Maydrakin. I'm so sorry to hear the story about the season ticket, but more sorry to hear you dad died. Huge sympathies. It's a terrible time for the club too. We know it was abandoned for months, the ticket office closed, no one there, and is now in administration fighting for its survival. It's obviously a case of crossed wires, people overworked or not being there to do the job. And now more have been made redundant. Plus it's probably illegal for the administrators to reimburse you because their obligation is to other creditors first. It's all crap right now, and a thousand times more so for you. I'm sorry it's been handled badly by the club earlier on, and now it's out of the hands of anyone who's left or come in. I understand you getting the frustrations off your chest, but I don't think there can be any progress at this stage until after the club has been sold. Hoping it is. And even then, who knows? Let's hope any new owners want Derby to be a strong community-embedded club again.
  7. I was appalled to read the EFL response to the Ramstrust questions. @San Fran Van Ramsarticulated some of it, but this determination to see Derby under new owners sent down the leagues irrespective of the integrity of the competition they run, is just vindictive. But what was worse for me was the wanton disregard for the welfare of our academy players who aren't allowed to be in the squad. Their plan can only be to try to destroy the Derby Academy by forcing the good prospects to leave in search of first team football. The fair and equitable solution would have been to establish a cutoff at the end of the transfer window and allow academy players to join the first team in addition to this. Again, I find it extraordinary that we have heard nothing from the PFA about this.
  8. I publish nonfiction books, so a great thread obviously! Cognitive bias isn't really my area, even though it's interesting, but Robin Hanson is one of my authors so I started The Elephant in the Brain off, but knew I was leaving the company so made sure he had a good editor to take it over: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Elephant_in_the_Brain. His Overcoming Bias blog and the partner site Less Wrong by Eliezer Yudkowsky are also well worth a deep dive.
  9. I still remember being in the large kitchen at work, on my own, and looking over to the kettle. As I watched, the switch at the base of the kettle moved down (a couple of centimetres) entirely on its own, turning the kettle on. I was freaked out at the time, but I guess there was some sort of short circuit that caused it. That said I can seem to have an affect on electrical equipment around me. For instance, when I'm in an emotional state, streetlights often go off as I pass underneath them while walking up a road. That's something calling "sliding" which I find interesting: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Street_light_interference_phenomenon
  10. Yet according to @angieram the administrators have had to engage lawyers at present to fight the case, even though the legal action cannot be pursued during administration, because we need a clear slate to be able to come out of admin. So Gibson is both adding additional costs to Derby during this time of dire peril, and by taking the action he is intentionally making it more difficult for Derby to exit administration. That sounds to me that he is pursuing a vendetta with the purpose of liquidating Derby County. If you're waiting for the EFL to step in and help us, you're going to be waiting a long time. If they were minded to they could have done this already, but clearly have chosen not to act. Hence the administrators have had to act and take money out of the club instead.
  11. I started the thread after reading a piece which said "Teesside Live understands Boro are indeed continuing to pursue their action against the Rams." And Angie seemed to confirm this with minutes from Ramstrust (I think). But then she adds (I don't know where thus comes from) that Gibson can't sue us if in administration, but if that were the case I don't understand why we would have engaged lawyers. But none of this suggests he's not suing the club. It seems pretty clear that he is. Why do you think otherwise?
  12. At the premiere Denis Villeneuve said his dream has been to film Dune since he was a teenager, when he started doing drawings and the designs for it. He was unhappy with the David Lynch adaptation for the times it deviated from the book. I've not read the book for a very long time, but I recognized some lines. My take is it's a love letter to the source material and very true to it. But it is kind of unsatisfactory that it ends halfway with no prospect (yet) of finishing it. It's such an interesting question. Originally the film was due out in the UK before now, but was put back to late October. My guess at the time was they were going to make a huge deal of it at the London Film Festival, which starts tomorrow. Ideally as the opening Gala film, but maybe the closing film instead. Then the festival programme was released and it was nowhere to be found, but then they announced last night's incredibly low-key UK premiere. But because Villeneuve was telling us that Part Two's future is uncertain and depends on receipts, my guess is it's the distribution team trying to give it every chance to make a big impact in the opening couple of weekends (which will define the film's future in terms of Hollywood perceptions). And the reason for that is likely Bond. After Covid, the entirety of the UK industry is pinning its hopes on Bond to get people back into cinemas. The Odeon Leicester Square, always the centre of the London Film Festival, is not partaking this year as every minute is booked out to show Bond instead. I presume the Dune team realized they'd be releasing at almost exactly the same time and would not have the screens to make an impact, so have stepped back to wait. Pure guesswork on my part, but it does make sense. PS I have no interest whatsoever in going to see 007!
  13. Dune tonight. It's beautiful and epic. As it's Denis Villeneuve it doesn't rush, so something I hadn't realized was it's only Part One. It's clearly a labour of love for the director and very true to the book (at least as far as I cold remember), but Edith Bowman (who was doing the Q&A) asked Villeneuve about Part Two and he replied that Warner Bros was waiting to see the receipts. And I wonder if it isn't too slow for a modern audience, rather like how some found Blade Runner 2049. I'd give it 8/10 as I felt there was a little too much exposition at the start before it got going. Out in cinemas 21st October.
  14. West Brom fan. When The Athletic launched they hired some high-profile reporters who were fans of the teams they covered whereas we got Ryan Conway. Is it better for a correspondent to also love the club, or would people rather they had no connection with us until given the job?
  15. That's a good summary. I was quite struck when viewing the Reading forum after we beat them, and someone said words to the effect "you can see why they don't concede many or score many". My recollection is that the beginning of the end for Jim Smith's Derby came after a heavy defeat, whereupon he decided he had no place for Francesco Baiano and would replace him with Daryl Powell. Shutting up shop can seem the right thing to do, but it can also be the recipe for a slow and painful demise. Rooney is in such a bind but I think if we're to survive he has to be a little more trusting of some players and a little less afraid, and release the shackles enough to give us more of a chance of scoring.
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