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Last evening winds picked up considerably, up to 30m per second.  Many people were not sufficiently prepared or dressed for that weather and last night the rescue squads were called out because so many had not returned to their vehicles.  It went better than feared, as all have been found, but many were exhausted.  The government had made it very difficult for people to get to the area, requiring folks to park far away from the eruption, when closer routes were available cutting the walking distance by at least half.  Now they have closed the area for all public visits because of dangerous gas emissions.  That doesn't make any sense, winds are high and in the same direction as before.

But safe this area is not, it is unpredictable

 

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From RUV:

Quote

The lava in Geldingadalur comes so deep from the bowels of the earth that a scientist at the Institute of Earth Sciences says it resembles a high-speed connection to the center of the mantle.

The rock in the eruption has been accurately identified. It comes from much deeper than the lava that has flowed on the Reykjanes peninsula for the last seven thousand years.

The lava that flows up in Geldingadalur is basalt, which is the main characteristic of the Icelandic volcanic belts. But how far below does this lava flow come from? Compared to what has erupted before in historical time in Reykjanes, this is a much more primitive prey that is most likely coming from much more depth than we have seen before, “says Sæmundur Ari Halldórsson, researcher at the Institute of Earth Sciences.

This basalt is called olivine toluite and is at a depth of 17 to 20 kilometers. The earth’s crust on the Reykjanes peninsula is 17 kilometers thick.

Colors in a geological map from Ísor show different lava flows on the Reykjanes peninsula. The light purple colors are lava that flowed around settlement but those that are darker; Þráinsskjaldarhraun and Stapafellshraun flowed more than seven thousand years ago.
The lava in Geldingadalur is similar to the thousands of years old lava.

There is noticeably more of carbon dioxide e.g. I understand then there was, for example, in Holuhraun. It is again a sign of a deep source. ”

The significance of this could be a long-lasting and very fluid eruption, and if that continues, we could be witnessing the birth of a "Shield volcano" - and if convention is followed, it will probably be given the name "Fagradalsdyngja". slightly less cat-walking-across-keyboard than "Eyjafjallajökull", I suppose.

Were you able to go to see the eruption, @ramit?

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1 hour ago, Eddie said:

From RUV:

The significance of this could be a long-lasting and very fluid eruption, and if that continues, we could be witnessing the birth of a "Shield volcano" - and if convention is followed, it will probably be given the name "Fagradalsdyngja". slightly less cat-walking-across-keyboard than "Eyjafjallajökull", I suppose.

Were you able to go to see the eruption, @ramit?

i can just see the tourist companies rubbing their hands in glee at the prospect of a long lasting "tourist eruption"  Covid is a bit of a spoilsport though, what with talk of a 4th wave hitting us now (we are so progressive) but you know, money talks and Covid walks, i would venture to bet.

Mrs ramit and i will soon be in the market for a house to buy and had considered some of the small towns on the peninsula as an option, but i think it's safe to say, that's out the window into the lava field now.  Thinking of the eastern fjords, it hasn't erupted there in a million years.

Uhm no i have not been to the site.  The hike to it was too long for my liking, but now they have opened a road they closed after a big earthquake damaged it a bit and it's only half the distance and they have marked the way as well.  Our teenage son shows no interest in going there and my Mrs ramit forbids me to.  Oh and no one will be allowed there for the next couple of days because of calm weather, this thing emits a fair amount of heavy gases.  i don't have good walking shoes, my back has been bothering me and uhm i broke a nail last week.

If your wife and you make that trip over in 22 you will likely get a chance to see this little monster up close.

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36 minutes ago, Stive Pesley said:

I love the way it dawns on everyone that they should perhaps start backing up a bit

Fortunately it wasn't far to go, a mountain slope being behind them.  Some of the spectators have been foolhardy and we're just grateful for every day without an accident.

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On 25/03/2021 at 19:30, ramit said:

Fortunately it wasn't far to go, a mountain slope being behind them.  Some of the spectators have been foolhardy and we're just grateful for every day without an accident.

Getting somewhat fed up with the people who insist upon standing right in front of the camera, talking on the phone and waving for 5 minutes. No problem with a quick 'Halló móðir' - just don't take all day over it.

I wonder how long the eruption will last. This is quite unlike the typical Reykjanes eruption - it seems to be fed directly from the mantle as opposed to a magma chamber within the crust.

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1 hour ago, Eddie said:

Getting somewhat fed up with the people who insist upon standing right in front of the camera, talking on the phone and waving for 5 minutes. No problem with a quick 'Halló móðir' - just don't take all day over it.

I wonder how long the eruption will last. This is quite unlike the typical Reykjanes eruption - it seems to be fed directly from the mantle as opposed to a magma chamber within the crust.

It is annoying, but we do have our share of young jerks.

It's hard to figure how long this will go on, but scientists are not expecting it to be ending in the next days or couple of weeks.  The big cone is called Northerner (Norðri), the one beside it Southerner (Suðri).  Northerner has increased activity in the last days at the cost of Southerner, so the flow has remained quite steady.  In less than two weeks this valley will have filled with lava, it is expected it will make it's way south toward the coastline.  Yep, fed directly from the mantle, which indicates to some that this is just the beginning of a period of a number of eruptions on the peninsula.

Earthquakes have occurred in Krýsuvík, which is closer to the city and in an area called Þrengslin which is on the mountain between Reykjavík and Hveragerði and Selfoss.  That is actually a bit worrying, we could be close to a big earthquake in that area, because of movements of the plate recently, tension has definitely built up there.  Am driving that mountain road tomorrow.  Interesting times.

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Correction, the fissures are 2, each about 200 meters long and situated 500-600 northeast of the original eruption, which has decreased in power as these new openings have been activated.  Public has been cleared out from area, gas pollution is high, winds are low.

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At around midnight, another fissure opened up, looks like southwest of the original eruption site.  It opened up really fast, there are no warnings before these things open, the whole area has become very dangerous.  There were hundreds of people there when the other two fissures opened, some very close.  i think they should close the area off for the public, at least for now, for things are developing rapidly.

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Scientists are expecting more fissures to open up in the northeast direction from the first site in Geldingadalur (Gelding Valley) and possibly reach Keilir mountain.  If that happens, then further fissures could open up in a southwest direction toward Nátthagi.  The magma channel is shown on this map, a straight line about 1 km deep.

 

Futurefissure.jpg

Edited by ramit
typo
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