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Fitness culture, injuries & winning


Ken Tram
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5 hours ago, RadioactiveWaste said:

I think there's something in the fact these days the physical side of the game is really pushing the limits of what they players bodie's can do in terms of fitness?

 

They’re pushed to the limits in everything now.

Sports science,nutrition,training etc.

Look at Leeds as an example,I read that Bielsa has a ridiculous training regime.

 

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16 minutes ago, Phoenix said:

Ballet. Ron Greenwood once got a Ballet star to go along to the 'ammers, to put them through some exercises, as he thought it would make them more supple. Not sure it went down well but the idea was right.

Yes I remember that, The Ballet star was Desmond Tutu

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10 hours ago, Ken Tram said:

I'm quite sensitive about knee injuries, because I had lots of knee injuries as a child, and had surgery on both knees.

Very painful. Excruciating, one might say! (The link between excruciating and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries is an unhappy coincidence.)

Poor Krystian Bielik, and the other injured players (and fans). I wouldn't even wish it on a Forest player!*

I think that there is a debate to be had about the fitness culture in football - both injury prevention and fitness levels - and whether or not clubs (and players) could do more (or do things differently).

And, therefore, perhaps fitness is an area that could be a possible opportunity for Derby to get an edge over other clubs.

* I might continue to make an exception for the Collymore chant! I'm only human!

ACL tear is a common injury in football and always will be. When the foot is placed on the floor, firmly, with the persons bodyweight loaded onto the foot and a force is exerted on the leg from a lateral position, the femur can only rotate so much before the ACL snaps. 

 

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1 hour ago, oldtimeram said:

Arrh, but they had cartilages in those days instead!

I went to Burton Grammar School in the sixties.

Most of the lads in my year played rugby and almost all of them suffered cartilage damage.

I avoided injury by taking the safer option of rock climbing and mountaineering which they considered too dangerous!

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I think there’s definitely more to the number of injuries you get than just “luck”. Otherwise there would be no point teams having fitness coaches, sports scientists etc etc. Naturally there’s still a lot of chance involved, particularly with certain injuries, but I’m pretty sure teams with better medical teams will see less injuries, and particularly less reoccurrences of previous injuries. It’s definitely worth investing in a high quality sports science team for that reason. I know we’ve made some changes to our medical/fitness teams recently, so I think we’re aware of that.

It remains to be seen if Bielik’s injury could have been avoided, for example, if our pitch wasn’t in such a poor condition.

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11 hours ago, Carl Sagan said:

We might believe we have more injuries (especially ACLs) because we follow our club more closely. It would be informative to see figures for the 92 and assess it. Surely a sports medicine team has been looking at the question? 

I just googled and found this report saying a club should expect one ACL injury every two years. And once a player has done it there's a 12% chance of having a second ACL tear, but three-quarters of those are the other leg https://www.physioroom.com/info/acl-knee-injury-players-who-overcame-it/#:~:text=With ACL injuries being so,1 every 2 seasons%2Fyears.

We’re seeing waaaaaay more than we should then.

20/21 - Bielik (2)

19/20 - Bielik

18/19 - Fozzy (3), Davies

17/18 - Winnall, Olson 

16/17 - Wilson, Fozzy (2)

15/16 - Hughes, Fozzy

14/15 - Thorne (2)

13/14 - Coutts

10/11 - Green

I may have even missed some at that.

 

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4 hours ago, Millenniumram said:

I think there’s definitely more to the number of injuries you get than just “luck”. Otherwise there would be no point teams having fitness coaches, sports scientists etc etc. Naturally there’s still a lot of chance involved, particularly with certain injuries, but I’m pretty sure teams with better medical teams will see less injuries, and particularly less reoccurrences of previous injuries. It’s definitely worth investing in a high quality sports science team for that reason. I know we’ve made some changes to our medical/fitness teams recently, so I think we’re aware of that.

It remains to be seen if Bielik’s injury could have been avoided, for example, if our pitch wasn’t in such a poor condition.

The injury can't be avoided. If the Tibia is stationary, then the Femur can only internally rotate so far before the ACL snaps and in doing so prevents a whole host of other problems from occurring. This is easily initiated when a players weight is distributed on that leg and a force comes laterally around knee height. 

Don't need a team of sports scientists. 

 

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32 minutes ago, Uptherams said:

The injury can't be avoided. If the Tibia is stationary, then the Femur can only internally rotate so far before the ACL snaps and in doing so prevents a whole host of other problems from occurring. This is easily initiated when a players weight is distributed on that leg and a force comes laterally around knee height. 

Don't need a team of sports scientists. 

 

Aight calm down Dr Uptherams

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1 hour ago, cannable said:

We’re seeing waaaaaay more than we should then.

20/21 - Bielik (2)

19/20 - Bielik

18/19 - Fozzy (3), Davies

17/18 - Winnall, Olson 

16/17 - Wilson, Fozzy (2)

15/16 - Hughes, Fozzy

14/15 - Thorne (2)

13/14 - Coutts

10/11 - Green

I may have even missed some at that.

 

Didn't see Keogh in there 

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17 hours ago, oldtimeram said:

Very few players in the 1960s and 70s had cruciate ligaments 😉

I’m beginning to wonder if it’s a terminology thing. I.e. what used to be called a cartilage injury is what today we call an ACL?

hennessey and Nish both suffered crippling knee injuries that were described as cartilage injuries. Nish’s injury v Sheff Utd was a classic ACL type of collapse. Hennessey was the same sort of physique as Thorne and Bielik. 

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