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Surnames, such strange things


jono
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Just a random musing but names are interesting (if you’re a bit of an anorak like me ) 

North, Tall, Smith, Johnson, Fletcher, Cooper and many others all with simple derivations. Physical characteristics, trade, or family. You can see where they come from. Yet there are others that arouse curiosity ... I mean, Drinkwater ? How did that come about ? It is the same in Europe. I knew Italians with names like Bevaqua (Drinkwater ) and Biacofiore (white flower) I sometimes wonder what the conversation was in 8th century England when some fellow was crowned Sidebottom ? Or Arbuthnot ?  We’ve got a Lightfoot a Tranter and a Holyrake in our family history. Where did they start I sometimes wonder. 
 

Dons “Jacket” or “Coats” and leaves 🤣

 

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I'm rather proud of my surname.

If spelt incorrectly, it the becomes the very thing that keeps each and every one of us alive!

Spelt correctly, and it is not only a fine handsome animal, but also a member of the family of animals that this very fine county of ours is named after.  

Also... "In 1393, during the reign of King Richard II, an Act was passed which made it compulsory for pubs and inns to have a sign in order to identify them as official watering holes. Many adopted The ***** **** as their sign as it was the personal badge of the King – today it is the fourth most popular pub name in the UK".

 

The only thing that lets it down is that bloody annoying and oh-so-not-funny "comedienne" bint!  😉

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Mine is a spelling mistake. It’s not very exciting, but it’s totally unique. We did a family history and found out that it was a normal name about 7 or 8 generations ago, and then it got spelt wrong, and it switched back and forth for a couple of generations, and then the misspelt version stuck. 

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9 minutes ago, TigerTedd said:

Mine is a spelling mistake. It’s not very exciting, but it’s totally unique. We did a family history and found out that it was a normal name about 7 or 8 generations ago, and then it got spelt wrong, and it switched back and forth for a couple of generations, and then the misspelt version stuck. 

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Last name: Grealish

The name derives from the Old Norman French word "le coc d'womble", meaning pitted or scarred, and is itself derived from the very early Germanic word "CockendeWombluck".

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There are some fantastic surnames in Spanish:
Caravaca - cow face is one of my favourites.

Paniagua - bread and water.

Matamoros - Moor (as in from North Africa) killer

Jarradecabezas - jar or jug of heads (no idea where that one could have come from)

Molina - windmill 

Then there are some well known people who you may not know the translation of their names:

Julio Iglesias - July Churches

Rafa Nadal and David Ferrer - Raphael Christmas and David Smith (both Catalán or Valencian surnames)

Iker Casilla - Iker Box (as in to fill in on a form)

Julen Guerrero - Julian Warrior 

Antonio Banderas - Anthony Flags

Penelope Cruz - Penelope Cross

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