Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Paul71

Death Penalty

Recommended Posts

56 minutes ago, reveldevil said:

I wouldn't be in favour of the death penalty for various reasons, but I wouldn't object if the cells for certain prisoners were equipped with a noose and instructions/encouragement on how to use it.

No, can't agree. That was what Harold Shipman and Fred West were allowed to do, no criminal should be allowed to ultimately decide their own sentence.

Share this post


Link to post

To the original point, we must anchor our justice principles around an unending belief that individuals can be rehabilitated. I totally get that what this individual had done is horrific and he should, absolutely, pay for his crimes. But he could do forty years inside and still only be 56. It's a really difficult one but come that time the poor, poor girls parents may well no longer be here and I can't see what good would come from keeping him looked up eternally if (and it is a huge if) he has been able to demonstrate true, lasting remorse. I'm not saying we plan to release, just that it should always remain an option for our justice system to be grounds around rehabilitation rather than irreversible punishment.

As a footnote, RIP Alesha and my prayers that her parents can, at some point in the future, find healing through time.

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, BaaLocks said:

To the original point, we must anchor our justice principles around an unending belief that individuals can be rehabilitated. I totally get that what this individual had done is horrific and he should, absolutely, pay for his crimes. But he could do forty years inside and still only be 56. It's a really difficult one but come that time the poor, poor girls parents may well no longer be here and I can't see what good would come from keeping him looked up eternally if (and it is a huge if) he has been able to demonstrate true, lasting remorse. I'm not saying we plan to release, just that it should always remain an option for our justice system to be grounds around rehabilitation rather than irreversible punishment.

As a footnote, RIP Alesha and my prayers that her parents can, at some point in the future, find healing through time.

 

This may be the most absurd post I've read on here.  The bloke hasn't nicked a bottle of booze from a shop.

Share this post


Link to post
7 hours ago, BaaLocks said:

To the original point, we must anchor our justice principles around an unending belief that individuals can be rehabilitated. I totally get that what this individual had done is horrific and he should, absolutely, pay for his crimes. But he could do forty years inside and still only be 56. It's a really difficult one but come that time the poor, poor girls parents may well no longer be here and I can't see what good would come from keeping him looked up eternally if (and it is a huge if) he has been able to demonstrate true, lasting remorse. I'm not saying we plan to release, just that it should always remain an option for our justice system to be grounds around rehabilitation rather than irreversible punishment.

As a footnote, RIP Alesha and my prayers that her parents can, at some point in the future, find healing through time.

I appreciate that. The problem for me with someone like this who clearly has a thing for young children and harming them, is that he can show all the remorse he likes but those feelings will just never go away.

Look at Jon Venables, what he did was clearly driven by a desire to see young children harmed. His continued desire to see young children being harmed and abused is clear with the images they keep finding. When they let him out, which they will, I just can't see how anyone can say he won't  do something again.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
12 hours ago, BaaLocks said:

To the original point, we must anchor our justice principles around an unending belief that individuals can be rehabilitated. I totally get that what this individual had done is horrific and he should, absolutely, pay for his crimes. But he could do forty years inside and still only be 56. It's a really difficult one but come that time the poor, poor girls parents may well no longer be here and I can't see what good would come from keeping him looked up eternally if (and it is a huge if) he has been able to demonstrate true, lasting remorse. I'm not saying we plan to release, just that it should always remain an option for our justice system to be grounds around rehabilitation rather than irreversible punishment.

As a footnote, RIP Alesha and my prayers that her parents can, at some point in the future, find healing through time.

It’s hard to imagine rehabilitation but this lad, however evil his deed, should be given the opportunity of turning his life around. Otherwise prisons are a waste of time. 

He is a danger at present and should be detained for a long time but only if he has that glint of hope will he do anything to change.

Strong emotion can make us want him dead but taking a life really won’t help.

Let’s all grieve for Alesha and hope we don’t see another crime of this nature.

Share this post


Link to post
13 hours ago, reveldevil said:

I wouldn't be in favour of the death penalty for various reasons, but I wouldn't object if the cells for certain prisoners were equipped with a noose and instructions/encouragement on how to use it.

I can only speak for myself and I am mellowing with age but I reckon I would want them to go prison for ever but be allowed in to beat 💩out of them whenever I felt the need and if I felt the need to pull the trigger then be allowed too.

If I felt the need to forgive them,then just leave them be in jail.

Edited by coneheadjohn

Share this post


Link to post
5 hours ago, Paul71 said:

I appreciate that. The problem for me with someone like this who clearly has a thing for young children and harming them, is that he can show all the remorse he likes but those feelings will just never go away.

Look at Jon Venables, what he did was clearly driven by a desire to see young children harmed. His continued desire to see young children being harmed and abused is clear with the images they keep finding. When they let him out, which they will, I just can't see how anyone can say he won't  do something again.

 

 

Yes, the Jon Venables case is a challenging one - he is now back behind bars and likely will not be released. Interestingly, before that, even James Bulger's mother wished to not have his new identity revealed as she recognised it would likely result in vigilante justice. 

Robert Thompson, recognised by police at the time as the ringleader of the attack on James Bulger, has not reoffended and is in a steady relationship with a partner who knows his true identity. Just that shows the complexity of it all.

I have some real issues about the definiition of 'public interest' in this case. I don't see how some redtop reader in Surrey can benefit from knowing the killer's identity. The high emotions generated by this case with the nature of the poor victim do lend towards a style of reporting that I can understand but I am not sure is entirely done for the right reasons. Had this been a victimised housewfie, finally murdered after years of domestic violence by a controlling and abusive husband, it likely wouldn't have made the front page.

Again, for the avoidance of doubt, this is a horrrific crime and the convicted murderer should feel the full wrath of justice but I can't help feeling a little compromised at the supposed reasons why this is of such interest to Joe Public.

As for your first point, on the ability of the convicted to be rehabilitated - I agree it looks rather unlikely but we cannot (even if we had the professional capacity to evaluate) make that statement at this time. People can change, as Robert Thompson seems to have shown, and we need to keep the ability to recognise that as a pillar of our justice system. Otherwise, and some would condone it, we may as well reinstate the death penalty and start chopping off hands for thieves. That is the alternate methodology to punishment but it is not one I see having a place in a civilised society (and I include America - albeit loosely - in that statement).

Edited by BaaLocks

Share this post


Link to post

I’m in favour of bringing the death penalty back but for only the most extreme cases. Everyone must have the opportunity to be rehabilitated. If it’s proven by a panel of experts that a convicted killer cannot be rehabilitated or refuses to take the opportunity then the death penalty should be considered. 

 

Edited by SouthStandDan

Share this post


Link to post
On 23 February 2019 at 01:53, Gee SCREAMER !! said:

 

This may be the most absurd post I've read on here.  The bloke hasn't nicked a bottle of booze from a shop.

Pretty absurd response in my opinion. No one is suggesting that he has committed such a trivial offence or should receive a sentence associated with nicking a bottle of booze. In fact the post isn't even suggesting he is ever released unless there is clear evidence that he has been rehabiltated. 

Share this post


Link to post
36 minutes ago, Tamworthram said:

Pretty absurd response in my opinion. No one is suggesting that he has committed such a trivial offence or should receive a sentence associated with nicking a bottle of booze. In fact the post isn't even suggesting he is ever released unless there is clear evidence that he has been rehabiltated. 

You can have your opinion.  If he was moved in next door to you i'm sure you would adopt mine quickly enough

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account.

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.