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SantosHalper

What are you reading?

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16 hours ago, AmericanRam said:

I am a fan of his also.'Kafka on the Shore' and '1Q84' both brilliant novels.

Glad to hear I'm not alone

I love Kafka, but not read 1Q84 yet - mainly due to the size! If you recommend it I will stick it on my list :)

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Slightly disappointed that no one on this thread has ever mentioned my series of novels about a young Rams fan abducted by aliens whose destiny is to save the Galaxy. He's great at football too.

First in the series is Johnny Mackintosh and the Spirit of London: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1847247741/ref=nosim?tag=keithmansf-21 Though some of you will like the scene at the site of the old Baseball Ground near the beginning of book two, Johnny Mackintosh: Star Blaze. The Derby mentions are subtle but there if you know to look for them.

Same publishing house as Stieg Larsson's Millennium Trilogy, so if you like those, surely you'd like mine too? :D

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On 3/7/2016 at 17:39, Carl Sagan said:

Slightly disappointed that no one on this thread has ever mentioned my series of novels about a young Rams fan abducted by aliens whose destiny is to save the Galaxy. He's great at football too.

First in the series is Johnny Mackintosh and the Spirit of London: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1847247741/ref=nosim?tag=keithmansf-21 Though some of you will like the scene at the site of the old Baseball Ground near the beginning of book two, Johnny Mackintosh: Star Blaze. The Derby mentions are subtle but there if you know to look for them.

Same publishing house as Stieg Larsson's Millennium Trilogy, so if you like those, surely you'd like mine too? :D

Great reviews pal on the Mackintosh books.Young adult librarian where I work is always looking for good,interesting stuff for our collection,will mention these to her.

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29 minutes ago, AmericanRam said:

Great reviews pal on the Mackintosh books.Young adult librarian where I work is always looking for good,interesting stuff for our collection,will mention these to her.

Cheers, mate. First book has scenes in the US Embassy over in London and American characters, while second has scenes in NY (that I went over to write!) to make sure it was all accurate. Third is Johnny Mackintosh: Battle for Earth. May be more but I'm working on a couple of other things at the moment...

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On 09/05/2015 at 21:11, Mostyn6 said:

I have a lot of books to catch up on, luckily I have two weeks in Crete in a month, so that will give me time to try and read as many of the following as possible:-

The Reaper - Steven Dunne

The Disciple - Steven Dunne

Stanley Kotep in: A thickening of the plot - (Dan) DC Clark (my mate)

Kill me if you can - James Patterson

Sycamore Row - John Grisham

Tales from the Secret Footballer - Who knows?

The Killer Department - Robert Cullen, Hunting the Devil - Richard Lourie, The Red Ripper - Peter Conradi (all about the Red Ripper - google him!)

A fun fact for you.

The author Steven Dunne used to be my secondary school teacher

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54 minutes ago, Heisenberg said:

A fun fact for you.

The author Steven Dunne used to be my secondary school teacher

I still haven't finished that. I've kind of gone off reading on my phone screen. So the books I have on kindle are still sitting there.

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Read American Psycho by Brett Easton Ellis recently. I think it's changed my life.

Impossible to carry on reading at times, impossible to put down at others. The film (with an excellent performance by Christian Bale) is more of a black comedy/slasher and although decent enough, gets nowhere near the book.

Horribly vivid, meticulously detailed violence in the second half of the book. I'm not one that is normally affected by that kind of thing but it made me wince several times.

Set in the 80's during the height of the American Yuppie scene, Patrick Bateman has basically no redeemable features or likeable qualities. He's from a wealthy family, attended Harvard University, works on Wall Street, has a cocaine habit, is good looking, spends countless hours working out and preening himself in front of the mirror, is absolutely absorbed by the consumer culture, is a liar and by night murders and tortures tramps, prostitutes, business associates... and yet I somehow at various points find myself somehow having sympathy with him and his situation and find myself being more disgusted by the society he is part of and the various people in his life than his actions.

Dostoyevskian themes, interspersed with critiques of Huey Lewis and the News, Genesis and Whitney Houston, dispassionate breakdowns of the specifications of hi-fi systems and TV sets, and endless discriptions of what everyone is wearing. Sounds terrible but I've never read a book like it.

I think it's genius, but wouldn't want to read it again.

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On Monday, October 03, 2016 at 18:20, JoetheRam said:

Read American Psycho by Brett Easton Ellis recently. I think it's changed my life.

Impossible to carry on reading at times, impossible to put down at others. The film (with an excellent performance by Christian Bale) is more of a black comedy/slasher and although decent enough, gets nowhere near the book.

Horribly vivid, meticulously detailed violence in the second half of the book. I'm not one that is normally affected by that kind of thing but it made me wince several times.

Set in the 80's during the height of the American Yuppie scene, Patrick Bateman has basically no redeemable features or likeable qualities. He's from a wealthy family, attended Harvard University, works on Wall Street, has a cocaine habit, is good looking, spends countless hours working out and preening himself in front of the mirror, is absolutely absorbed by the consumer culture, is a liar and by night murders and tortures tramps, prostitutes, business associates... and yet I somehow at various points find myself somehow having sympathy with him and his situation and find myself being more disgusted by the society he is part of and the various people in his life than his actions.

Dostoyevskian themes, interspersed with critiques of Huey Lewis and the News, Genesis and Whitney Houston, dispassionate breakdowns of the specifications of hi-fi systems and TV sets, and endless discriptions of what everyone is wearing. Sounds terrible but I've never read a book like it.

I think it's genius, but wouldn't want to read it again.

I read it..and thought it's visceral nature in parts made a worthy read and worth the tiresome bits. Then started the sort of follow-up. Glamorama was it..was like American Psycho x10. Totally confusing, tedious and awful... 

Good reads - The Road (film was poor though) and The Secret Race.

 

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Just started a book (a real book, I'm an ex librarian) called The Furnace of Hell by Richard and John Wilson. I was hooked by the blurb:-

"Their world is blown apart when they are caught up in a violent student-led jihadist movement and ensnared in a world of strange prophecies and ritualistic violence. She is abducted by a crazed juju princess but is rescued by a Touareg warrior and spirited north into the desert"

Absolute crap but great reading!

 

 

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1 minute ago, Bridgford Ram said:

Anyone read Harlan Coben, Linwood Barclay, Dennis Lehane, Simon Kernick type books?

I've read quite a few Harlan Coben books and enjoyed them, mostly the Myron Bolitar series.

Linwood Barclay I've always been put off by the generic covers, are they worth reading?

 

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The Silk Roads by Peter Frankopan.

Since I retired I have been reading a lot more than I have for many years and although I'm only a quarter of the way into this book it has taught me so much about early history in the East - how much we concentrate on Europe and ignore that area of the world when we teach history; how far ahead of us were the likes of Egypt, Persia and others, culturally, educationally, architecturally; how much trade and commerce was going on over huge distances and how important wars and religion were and how they have shaped our current world

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10 hours ago, reveldevil said:

I've read quite a few Harlan Coben books and enjoyed them, mostly the Myron Bolitar series.

Linwood Barclay I've always been put off by the generic covers, are they worth reading?

 

I love the Myron Bolitar books - there is a new one out soon / now.  I would also recommend Harlan Coben's standalone books.  I have not read a bad one.

I would really recommend Linwood Barclay - similar to Coben in a lot of ways - I can honestly say I have enjoyed them all and would probably pick him as my favourite author if pressed.  Just beware I think one of his books is extremely short (Amazon reviews will quickly tell you which) I wouldn't want you to read that and be disappointed.  There are also a couple of sequential stories (including his current trilogy) or books with common characters.  I always read books in order of publication to avoid these sort of issues.

I also should have listed Peter James and Mark Billingham as authors I always read.

Do you recommend any @reveldevil

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2 hours ago, Bridgford Ram said:

I love the Myron Bolitar books - there is a new one out soon / now.  I would also recommend Harlan Coben's standalone books.  I have not read a bad one.

I would really recommend Linwood Barclay - similar to Coben in a lot of ways - I can honestly say I have enjoyed them all and would probably pick him as my favourite author if pressed.  Just beware I think one of his books is extremely short (Amazon reviews will quickly tell you which) I wouldn't want you to read that and be disappointed.  There are also a couple of sequential stories (including his current trilogy) or books with common characters.  I always read books in order of publication to avoid these sort of issues.

I also should have listed Peter James and Mark Billingham as authors I always read.

Do you recommend any @reveldevil

I've enjoyed James Lee Burkes books, and loved all the Rebus books.

Pretty much any crime or thriller novel I'll read, the Robert Galbraith books are good too.

 

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