Jump to content

vonwright

Member
  • Posts

    227
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Under normal circumstances we'd probably all just shrug and take the positives (and there are plenty). Feels weirdly gutting when I suspect we are all hoping for a miracle.
  2. They all run together. Arguably the risk-reward in the Lampard season was justified only if we had immediately slashed expenditure to make ourselves more sustainable once it failed. Otherwise you might find no one wants to buy your debt-ridden and loss-making business, and eventually end up with a huge points penalty for going into administration. The reason he couldn't find a buyer was because of the way he'd run the club.
  3. Fair enough. I don't know exactly what he said, and you are right - I'm not that interested in to what extent it could be considered a 'formal undertaking', as opposed to just part of a pattern of giving fans a false sense of security.
  4. Is your point that in the 'real world', someone who has spent a fortune on a football club, saddled it with huge debts and completely unsustainable wages, who then finds out no one wants to buy that club, might one day decide to dump the club into administration and walk away if the EFL refuse him a loan to add to all the club's other debts? Even if he told the fans who cared deeply about his club that he'd protect it, and explicitly said he wouldn't walk away until he'd found a buyer? Okay. Maybe that happens in the 'real world'. In which case what also happens in the 'real world' is that people like me judge people like him. With good reason. All the choices he made that put us here were his, all the reassurances he gave he chose to give. Or perhaps he wasn't living in the 'real world' when he did the reckless things he did, and gave the reassurances he wouldn't keep?
  5. Hate is way too strong for me, but definitely angry. Complains about spending £200m of his own money on the club - well couldn't you have spent some of that not saddling us with a crippling, and possibly fatal mountain of debt? Fails to pay £26m of tax, fails to submit accounts, defends to the hilt accounting policies that appear to have hidden our slide into complete unsustainability. Says nothing to the fans for months, letting them believe all is fine. Then bails, leaving us with a 12-point penalty (with more to follow), huge debts, and no stadium or assets to speak of. Staff out of jobs, suppliers out of pocket and the club facing the very real prospect of failing to find a buyer and going out of business. This would be bad enough with any company. With a football club it's much worse. It means a lot to a lot of people. There is a reason Google don't get an open-topped bus tour through San Francisco every time they end the year as America's top search engine.
  6. In any case which fans does he really think are going to be sympathetic to the line: 'I spend £200m putting your club in such a perilous position it may now go out of business entirely. And now I only have £300m left!' I would hope he's taken his moral responsibilities seriously in taking this step, and can honestly say he's done everything he could to secure the club's future. Because if we do get liquidated, that's the only thing he will be remembered for.
  7. The more I read the angrier I get. It's one thing gambling with your own money, but this was gambling with the very existence of the club - in other words gambling with something which has been very important to generations of people with a fraction of the money that Mel has. It's not even like he's gone bankrupt in the process, just walked away with his overpriced stadium and list of people who are 'really' to blame.
  8. I agree, and in any case it feels like it barely matters any more whether it was 'technically compliant' or not. Like arguing whether we 'technically' met building regulations while the house crumbles to the ground. If we don't find a buyer - and I really don't think we are an appealing prospect just now - we need to understand how serious this could be.
  9. That's fair, and I'd like to know more about the tax bill, too. From memory our entire annual running costs were about £35m to £40m in the last two years for which we've submitted accounts, so an unpaid £26m PAYE bill feels high (and, I note in passing, higher than the £20m I think Mel claimed we'd lost in revenue due to Covid).
  10. Bottom line for me is that while I can accept a) Covid has led to a huge drop off in revenues and b) the EFL hasn't covered itself in glory with the p and s stuff, it remains the case that we've been massively overspending for years, we've run up debts (and tax bills) that we can't settle, and it feels irrelevant now whether our accounting system was within the rules or not. What matters is the financial reality behind it, and for that - for the fact we were in such a precarious position when Covid hit - I'm afraid I do blame the owner.
  11. Who is going to fight the nine plus three now anyway? Mel? It'll be 21 and we are going down, but in a way that's the least of our worries now.
  12. I should probably have put this in a different thread, kept this one for saying: well done lads, bloody proud of you.
  13. Yep. Completely miss the big story, then take it out on Rooney because the people you should be holding to account won't talk to you. Journalists are so scared of having their 'access' revoked that they end up failing to do any actual journalism. But what 'access' do they really have? They just get a free ticket to the match and all these meaningless press conferences. I wish someone had been actually holding the club to account over the last few months rather than cravenly going along with the 'nothing to see here' line.
  14. Okay so the club say nothing about their finances for months, despite loads of negative speculation. Then they file documents in preparation to go into administration. Journalists find out and the EFL issue a statement saying 'That is fine, when it happens we will apply a 12 pts deduction'. Finally DCFC put out a statement saying 'Okay yes it's true but it IS ALL THE EFL'S FAULT'. It just doesn't feel like a negotiating strategy, does it? What are the EFL supposed to say in response? 'Sorry Mel we'd never thought of it like that, please don't go?' And negotiating for what? The EFL aren't going to pay our bills. They aren't going to give Mel his money back. We were supposed to be negotiating over the size of the penalty for our dodgy accounts. If threatening administration was a tactic relating to _that_, it would be a very odd one. 'You want 9pts, we want six. Very well. You've left us with no choice but to take an additional 12. Good day sir!'
  15. Agh, it just makes me so angry. How badly do you have to have run things if you are worth half a billion yet your only choices are to sell the club to whoever will buy (to pay for your expensive mistakes), or to put the club you claim to love in administration, forcing them into a lower league and undoing years of work on the academy/developing players, who can now leave for peanuts? 'The EFL made it hard to sell...' Cry me a river. You are only so desperate to sell because of the consequences of your decisions. It's your mess, no one else's.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.