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The Key Club King

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About The Key Club King

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  • Location
    Derby

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    South Upper - Block F

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  1. FFP hasn't stopped smaller clubs going up the leagues. The amount of clubs going into administration has also dropped dramatically since FFP. The average wage in the EPL is 5 times that of an EFL player. Yet the clubs that go between the leagues change every year, just as they did prior to the enormous sums of money going to the EPL. A wage cap might make the game more affordable for the supporters.
  2. A global football wage cap would be great but I don't think it is necessary beyond the Championship. Foreign players would be less likely to play in the Championship and the standard would go down somewhat, but the English lads won't lkely go anywhere as there are very few English players that have been successful outside of the British Isles. And for those that think that the EFL undersell the TV rights, may I remind you what overpaying did to ITV Digital. The interest from TV networks and advertisers is far, far less than the Premier League. The rights are worth what the broadcasters are prepared to pay and the broadcasters cannot sell their subscriptions based on Championship football and not much else. Only the Premier League and Champions League can sell mass subscriptions.
  3. Excellent post in general on the future of the PL/EFL. A couple of my thoughts on it: The Football League's attendances, as with the Premier League's, have been rising steadily since the 1980s and there is no sign of this changing yet or any indication that it may changw. PL teams pay enormous amounts to EFL teams for their best players which suggests that a hard bargain is being made rather than fish in a barrell. No other second tier league in Europe comes close to the Championship in terms of player sale revenue. Player wages are the obvious issue and that is indeed a result of pressure from the top flight. The only way around this is a wage cap that somehow incorporates the relegated club's inflated wage bill into the system for a brief period. I would suggest a return to a more even distribution of income between the leagues that still rewards the top clubs the most to keep international interest.
  4. Set a limit to spending and wages AND allow an owner to plow in £100m? Does that make the limit £100m then? Villa got promoted last year but the turnover of different clubs getting promoted/relegated from the Premier League remains pretty much the same since 1992 and all the extra money. Parachute payments have made little difference to promotion and relegation, which I find remarkable given that they are over 100% of turnover. The EFL's job is to make and uphold rules that clubs agree upon. Some of these rules are to stop financial mismanagement by its members. The number of clubs going into administration has gone down hugely since FFP was introduced. It isn't perfect, but the clubs that complain are usually the ones that are dangerously close to the limits.
  5. I think a salary cap would be an excellent idea. Despite the huge amounts of money in the Premier League the gap between the bottom teams and the top of the Championship has not noticeably widened. Ultimately the players that are not good enough in the Prem will either have to go abroad or work in the Championship. The record of English players abroad is pretty awful so I cannot see a great demand for them elsewhere. Premier League clubs could be forced to introduce relegation clauses that reduce wages in the wake of relegation to help reduce their wage bills to comply with the salary cap.
  6. If a player cannot get into an average team that struggles to score goals, then I would say they are not that good. It could be due to fitness or ability - either way, if he is deficient in either one then he is not good enough. In terms of it being the teams fault or style of play, then I would say that Waghorn gets an ok return and half of his games are played out wide. He needs to get into the team regularly and then score some goals to prove that he is good enough. Until then, he isn't. As he hasn't proved himself at Championship level before, then saying otherwise is probably wishful thinking.
  7. Lower league journeyman, over-the-hill, brick outhouse targetman you say? Done that, worked out alright.
  8. As a reduced terms back-up he would be excellent cover and he has been a good servant in his time here. If the extension has been triggered by appearances then good luck to him. In terms of the wages value, then I doubt he would command half the wage that he did two years ago so he would not be representing good value I feel - a bit like Darren Bent two years ago. However, there is nothing that can be done about it now so we should makes the most of his experience.
  9. £20k a week for a back-up defender is horrifically high for a championship club.
  10. Quite right with this. Against Barnsley he was getting dogs abuse for not closing down the keeper when it is far more likely that he was told by Cocu to stay deep and hold the team's shape.
  11. They can look but they won't find anyone who will have them on their wages. Only the top five European leagues pay a higher average salary than the Championship and very few Championship players would be good enough to play in them. Even when wages in the Premier League were lower than Italy and Spain, very few made the move abroad. Generally speaking, English players have not been good enough to play abroad.
  12. Absolutely right. There are 22 players on the pitch all cheating to some level so it is unsurprising that refs get things wrong. Martin was a terrible diver at the time so he could hardly complain when a ref gets a decision wrong. The sense of injustice in the crowd drove the atmosphere against Charlton when Bielik got sent off last week. The ref got hammered for it even though it was a clear red card.
  13. Maybe that's where the problem is. We set up to oppose the opposition because we haven't really got many strengths of our own i.e. the players we have aren't very good.
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