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ilkleyram

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  1. Like
    ilkleyram got a reaction from Angry Ram in What a great story   
    FA Cup though, not the League Cup
     
  2. Like
    ilkleyram reacted to reverendo de duivel in Forest (A) Match Thread   
    Improvement seems to be coming along nicely in recent weeks, it's not unreasonable to suggest results will start following the same curve.
    Hate losing, especially to Forest, but I enjoyed today's performance and thought we just needed to catch a break.
    I'd be fairly confident we'll be above Forest come season's end, I just think Cocu's way of playing has a far higher ceiling than Lamouchi's, which looks Rowettesque at best.
  3. Like
    ilkleyram got a reaction from ariotofmyown in Minutes Silence.   
    I'm old enough to remember my dad pulling the car over to the side of the road in Derby at 11.00am on November 11th, along with everyone else and shops and streets coming to a halt; I can also remember the 60's and early 70's when the national interest in remembering the fallen steadily declined so much so that the Royal British Legion almost went 'out of business' such was the decreasing amount of interest. It was the Falklands war in the early 80's with the backdrop of the fighting and bombing in Ireland that really changed the national mood regarding the remembering of the dead from warfare.
    We've now steadily gone to the other extreme so that those of us who go on Saturday will be 'remembering' again.  From a football perspective, why can't we remember on the Friday/Saturday/Sunday around Remembrance Sunday, whether we're home or away, rather than twice? And a minutes 'silence/remembrance' filled by the Last Post and/or a poem seems to me to be a perfectly good and respectful way of remembering those who have died in wars and conflicts, especially when there are lots of opportunities to go to churches/parades on the Sunday before Armistice Day should anyone wish to do so.
  4. Like
    ilkleyram got a reaction from cannable in Minutes Silence.   
    I'm old enough to remember my dad pulling the car over to the side of the road in Derby at 11.00am on November 11th, along with everyone else and shops and streets coming to a halt; I can also remember the 60's and early 70's when the national interest in remembering the fallen steadily declined so much so that the Royal British Legion almost went 'out of business' such was the decreasing amount of interest. It was the Falklands war in the early 80's with the backdrop of the fighting and bombing in Ireland that really changed the national mood regarding the remembering of the dead from warfare.
    We've now steadily gone to the other extreme so that those of us who go on Saturday will be 'remembering' again.  From a football perspective, why can't we remember on the Friday/Saturday/Sunday around Remembrance Sunday, whether we're home or away, rather than twice? And a minutes 'silence/remembrance' filled by the Last Post and/or a poem seems to me to be a perfectly good and respectful way of remembering those who have died in wars and conflicts, especially when there are lots of opportunities to go to churches/parades on the Sunday before Armistice Day should anyone wish to do so.
  5. Clap
    ilkleyram got a reaction from RoyMac5 in Minutes Silence.   
    Oh come on @RamNut, you're an intelligent guy and you know full well that's a daft question. Is four minutes too much considering the sacrifice? Or 5? Where do you stop?
    The two minute silence was originally a South African invention in the immediate aftermath of WW1 and occurred every single day, starting at noon, for a year. Parts of Cape Town ground to a complete halt. Perhaps we should do that?  It was later taken up by the King across the then Empire shortly before the first Armistice Day and altered to 11am on the 11th day of the 11th month and even that was a slightly artificial time and date - the peace Treaty of Versailles wasn't actually agreed and signed until 1919 and WW1 hostilities continued after 11am in 1918 in some areas.
    By November 12th I could have stood in silence remembering those that fought and the fallen for some 7 minutes - one (roughly) at Derby, two at Notts (if they do that), two on Sunday and another two on Monday.  Is that enough for you?
    Football has, in my view, leapt onto a bandwagon as it so often does. And the danger is that we lose sight of the whole point of Remembrance by overdoing it. It becomes less special, less memorable.  Why do the FA/EFL insist on silence at the nearest home match for every club (in Derby's case, and many others, a full nine days before Armistice Day)? I dare say most on here won't celebrate Christmas on December 16th.   What would football do if it just happened to fall during an International break? 
    What exactly would be wrong in remembering on Remembrance Day weekend itself, only, home or away? 
  6. Clap
    ilkleyram got a reaction from archram in Minutes Silence.   
    Oh come on @RamNut, you're an intelligent guy and you know full well that's a daft question. Is four minutes too much considering the sacrifice? Or 5? Where do you stop?
    The two minute silence was originally a South African invention in the immediate aftermath of WW1 and occurred every single day, starting at noon, for a year. Parts of Cape Town ground to a complete halt. Perhaps we should do that?  It was later taken up by the King across the then Empire shortly before the first Armistice Day and altered to 11am on the 11th day of the 11th month and even that was a slightly artificial time and date - the peace Treaty of Versailles wasn't actually agreed and signed until 1919 and WW1 hostilities continued after 11am in 1918 in some areas.
    By November 12th I could have stood in silence remembering those that fought and the fallen for some 7 minutes - one (roughly) at Derby, two at Notts (if they do that), two on Sunday and another two on Monday.  Is that enough for you?
    Football has, in my view, leapt onto a bandwagon as it so often does. And the danger is that we lose sight of the whole point of Remembrance by overdoing it. It becomes less special, less memorable.  Why do the FA/EFL insist on silence at the nearest home match for every club (in Derby's case, and many others, a full nine days before Armistice Day)? I dare say most on here won't celebrate Christmas on December 16th.   What would football do if it just happened to fall during an International break? 
    What exactly would be wrong in remembering on Remembrance Day weekend itself, only, home or away? 
  7. Clap
    ilkleyram got a reaction from angieram in Minutes Silence.   
    Oh come on @RamNut, you're an intelligent guy and you know full well that's a daft question. Is four minutes too much considering the sacrifice? Or 5? Where do you stop?
    The two minute silence was originally a South African invention in the immediate aftermath of WW1 and occurred every single day, starting at noon, for a year. Parts of Cape Town ground to a complete halt. Perhaps we should do that?  It was later taken up by the King across the then Empire shortly before the first Armistice Day and altered to 11am on the 11th day of the 11th month and even that was a slightly artificial time and date - the peace Treaty of Versailles wasn't actually agreed and signed until 1919 and WW1 hostilities continued after 11am in 1918 in some areas.
    By November 12th I could have stood in silence remembering those that fought and the fallen for some 7 minutes - one (roughly) at Derby, two at Notts (if they do that), two on Sunday and another two on Monday.  Is that enough for you?
    Football has, in my view, leapt onto a bandwagon as it so often does. And the danger is that we lose sight of the whole point of Remembrance by overdoing it. It becomes less special, less memorable.  Why do the FA/EFL insist on silence at the nearest home match for every club (in Derby's case, and many others, a full nine days before Armistice Day)? I dare say most on here won't celebrate Christmas on December 16th.   What would football do if it just happened to fall during an International break? 
    What exactly would be wrong in remembering on Remembrance Day weekend itself, only, home or away? 
  8. Clap
    ilkleyram got a reaction from The Orange Pimpernel in Minutes Silence.   
    Oh come on @RamNut, you're an intelligent guy and you know full well that's a daft question. Is four minutes too much considering the sacrifice? Or 5? Where do you stop?
    The two minute silence was originally a South African invention in the immediate aftermath of WW1 and occurred every single day, starting at noon, for a year. Parts of Cape Town ground to a complete halt. Perhaps we should do that?  It was later taken up by the King across the then Empire shortly before the first Armistice Day and altered to 11am on the 11th day of the 11th month and even that was a slightly artificial time and date - the peace Treaty of Versailles wasn't actually agreed and signed until 1919 and WW1 hostilities continued after 11am in 1918 in some areas.
    By November 12th I could have stood in silence remembering those that fought and the fallen for some 7 minutes - one (roughly) at Derby, two at Notts (if they do that), two on Sunday and another two on Monday.  Is that enough for you?
    Football has, in my view, leapt onto a bandwagon as it so often does. And the danger is that we lose sight of the whole point of Remembrance by overdoing it. It becomes less special, less memorable.  Why do the FA/EFL insist on silence at the nearest home match for every club (in Derby's case, and many others, a full nine days before Armistice Day)? I dare say most on here won't celebrate Christmas on December 16th.   What would football do if it just happened to fall during an International break? 
    What exactly would be wrong in remembering on Remembrance Day weekend itself, only, home or away? 
  9. Clap
    ilkleyram got a reaction from Spanish in Minutes Silence.   
    Oh come on @RamNut, you're an intelligent guy and you know full well that's a daft question. Is four minutes too much considering the sacrifice? Or 5? Where do you stop?
    The two minute silence was originally a South African invention in the immediate aftermath of WW1 and occurred every single day, starting at noon, for a year. Parts of Cape Town ground to a complete halt. Perhaps we should do that?  It was later taken up by the King across the then Empire shortly before the first Armistice Day and altered to 11am on the 11th day of the 11th month and even that was a slightly artificial time and date - the peace Treaty of Versailles wasn't actually agreed and signed until 1919 and WW1 hostilities continued after 11am in 1918 in some areas.
    By November 12th I could have stood in silence remembering those that fought and the fallen for some 7 minutes - one (roughly) at Derby, two at Notts (if they do that), two on Sunday and another two on Monday.  Is that enough for you?
    Football has, in my view, leapt onto a bandwagon as it so often does. And the danger is that we lose sight of the whole point of Remembrance by overdoing it. It becomes less special, less memorable.  Why do the FA/EFL insist on silence at the nearest home match for every club (in Derby's case, and many others, a full nine days before Armistice Day)? I dare say most on here won't celebrate Christmas on December 16th.   What would football do if it just happened to fall during an International break? 
    What exactly would be wrong in remembering on Remembrance Day weekend itself, only, home or away? 
  10. Like
    ilkleyram got a reaction from Carnero in Minutes Silence.   
    I'm old enough to remember my dad pulling the car over to the side of the road in Derby at 11.00am on November 11th, along with everyone else and shops and streets coming to a halt; I can also remember the 60's and early 70's when the national interest in remembering the fallen steadily declined so much so that the Royal British Legion almost went 'out of business' such was the decreasing amount of interest. It was the Falklands war in the early 80's with the backdrop of the fighting and bombing in Ireland that really changed the national mood regarding the remembering of the dead from warfare.
    We've now steadily gone to the other extreme so that those of us who go on Saturday will be 'remembering' again.  From a football perspective, why can't we remember on the Friday/Saturday/Sunday around Remembrance Sunday, whether we're home or away, rather than twice? And a minutes 'silence/remembrance' filled by the Last Post and/or a poem seems to me to be a perfectly good and respectful way of remembering those who have died in wars and conflicts, especially when there are lots of opportunities to go to churches/parades on the Sunday before Armistice Day should anyone wish to do so.
  11. Like
    ilkleyram got a reaction from angieram in Minutes Silence.   
    I'm old enough to remember my dad pulling the car over to the side of the road in Derby at 11.00am on November 11th, along with everyone else and shops and streets coming to a halt; I can also remember the 60's and early 70's when the national interest in remembering the fallen steadily declined so much so that the Royal British Legion almost went 'out of business' such was the decreasing amount of interest. It was the Falklands war in the early 80's with the backdrop of the fighting and bombing in Ireland that really changed the national mood regarding the remembering of the dead from warfare.
    We've now steadily gone to the other extreme so that those of us who go on Saturday will be 'remembering' again.  From a football perspective, why can't we remember on the Friday/Saturday/Sunday around Remembrance Sunday, whether we're home or away, rather than twice? And a minutes 'silence/remembrance' filled by the Last Post and/or a poem seems to me to be a perfectly good and respectful way of remembering those who have died in wars and conflicts, especially when there are lots of opportunities to go to churches/parades on the Sunday before Armistice Day should anyone wish to do so.
  12. Haha
    ilkleyram reacted to rynny in U23s v Feyenoord   
  13. Haha
    ilkleyram got a reaction from ramit in U23s v Feyenoord   
    Or that he's still en route from Iceland and cream crackered
    Beat me rynny 😀
  14. Like
    ilkleyram got a reaction from bigbadbob in Lawrence and Bennett Convicted of drink driving   
    Not correct @rammieib
    You can, and I did several times in my career, discipline someone and find them guilty of gross misconduct and not dismiss them summarily as I was entitled to do under my company’s disciplinary procedures. The reasons always were that the employee satisfied me as to the mitigating factors and that their behaviour was never likely to be repeated. 
    From the (very) little we know about Keogh’s case this might have been an example of just that. Derby went through a formal disciplinary process, possibly found him guilty of gross misconduct but, as part of the disciplinary action (and given the possible mitigating factors) decided to offer him a reduced contract. I am guessing. 
    What we think we know is that Keogh refused the offer thus leaving Derby with limited options. 
    Without any formal and official statements on either side it’s hard to know for sure. No doubt that will change after the appeal or appeal period is over. 
  15. Cheers
    ilkleyram reacted to rammieib in Lawrence and Bennett Convicted of drink driving   
    You are correct, my mistake.
  16. Like
    ilkleyram got a reaction from The Orange Pimpernel in Lawrence and Bennett Convicted of drink driving   
    Not correct @rammieib
    You can, and I did several times in my career, discipline someone and find them guilty of gross misconduct and not dismiss them summarily as I was entitled to do under my company’s disciplinary procedures. The reasons always were that the employee satisfied me as to the mitigating factors and that their behaviour was never likely to be repeated. 
    From the (very) little we know about Keogh’s case this might have been an example of just that. Derby went through a formal disciplinary process, possibly found him guilty of gross misconduct but, as part of the disciplinary action (and given the possible mitigating factors) decided to offer him a reduced contract. I am guessing. 
    What we think we know is that Keogh refused the offer thus leaving Derby with limited options. 
    Without any formal and official statements on either side it’s hard to know for sure. No doubt that will change after the appeal or appeal period is over. 
  17. Like
    ilkleyram got a reaction from rammieib in Lawrence and Bennett Convicted of drink driving   
    Not correct @rammieib
    You can, and I did several times in my career, discipline someone and find them guilty of gross misconduct and not dismiss them summarily as I was entitled to do under my company’s disciplinary procedures. The reasons always were that the employee satisfied me as to the mitigating factors and that their behaviour was never likely to be repeated. 
    From the (very) little we know about Keogh’s case this might have been an example of just that. Derby went through a formal disciplinary process, possibly found him guilty of gross misconduct but, as part of the disciplinary action (and given the possible mitigating factors) decided to offer him a reduced contract. I am guessing. 
    What we think we know is that Keogh refused the offer thus leaving Derby with limited options. 
    Without any formal and official statements on either side it’s hard to know for sure. No doubt that will change after the appeal or appeal period is over. 
  18. Like
    ilkleyram got a reaction from 86 Schmokes & a Pancake in Lawrence and Bennett Convicted of drink driving   
    Not correct @rammieib
    You can, and I did several times in my career, discipline someone and find them guilty of gross misconduct and not dismiss them summarily as I was entitled to do under my company’s disciplinary procedures. The reasons always were that the employee satisfied me as to the mitigating factors and that their behaviour was never likely to be repeated. 
    From the (very) little we know about Keogh’s case this might have been an example of just that. Derby went through a formal disciplinary process, possibly found him guilty of gross misconduct but, as part of the disciplinary action (and given the possible mitigating factors) decided to offer him a reduced contract. I am guessing. 
    What we think we know is that Keogh refused the offer thus leaving Derby with limited options. 
    Without any formal and official statements on either side it’s hard to know for sure. No doubt that will change after the appeal or appeal period is over. 
  19. Clap
    ilkleyram reacted to angieram in Keogh Sacked   
    I have felt too emotional about the whole situation to offer my view up to now.
    My heart is broken for a good captain and warrior for DCFC. To be sacked from the club you have given 100% to on the pitch over seven gruelling seasons must be humiliating and make you feel dreadful.
    However, my head now questions how much of Keogh's passion for Derby is real. The least favourable offer he turned down from the club, if accurate, of £3,000 per week, is more than the prime minister's salary and only slightly less than the chief police constable of Derbyshire who has responsibility for a huge budget and staff team  who do a tremendously difficult job every day at work.
    He was also being offered free state of the art rehabilitation facilities, could start to work on his coaching badges if he wished and presumably would also be free to supplement his income with appearances on Sky ("like you say") or other options if that is his choice. Most importantly in all this he was being offered an opportunity to retain his status as a good servant of the club and the adoration and support of the fans.
    He has chosen to reject all this for what? More money. Not much of a swap in my opinion.
    His action will now by actively costing the club too as they will have been taking expensive legal advice and will have to continue to do so over the appeal and possible tribunal.
    People are wondering why no official statement from Derby. I wonder whether the 'statement' we are reading is actually the dismissal letter to Keogh as the wording in it, including the 14 days' appeal time, reads like a letter from HR. 
    I don't know if I am being overly supportive of my club, but the whole way this story has broken makes me think it has come from Keogh's side. He clearly feels very aggrieved about the way he is being treated.
    I also think this will have been going back and forward for some time, that this is just the latest play from the club and that they might have been hoping for a response from Keogh that would have allowed him a successful appeal, rather than a messy, public and prolonged visit to an industrial tribunal.
    All this is huge speculation on my part, for which I hold my hands up. It is coloured by my huge love for our club, rather than for any individual player, no matter how good a servant he has been to DCFC.
    What I do know is that while Keogh still has my sympathy, he's lost my respect. 
     
     
  20. Clap
    ilkleyram reacted to Mucker1884 in New parents   
    1/  Teach them the difference between "of" and "have". 
    2/  When they are sad, pat them on the head, and say "Their, There, They're"
    3/  DCFC "lose" games.  Women from Nott***ham are "Loose".  There's a difference!
    4/  Do not encourage them to play Peek-a-BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!  It becomes a bad habit!
    5/  @Boycie isn't actually that funny bloke from the telly... or anywhere else, for that matter!
    6/  Teach them the difference between an eye and a horn.  (No smut please... children are reading!)
    7/  If they ain't truly into The Rams by the time they are 12, let them know the freebie season tickets run out, and you ain't wasting your money on a ticket for them... I'm looking at you, Grandson!
    8/  If they are ever sick, tell them never to declare "I've add more van free", as someone may be filming them!
    9/  @Red_Dawn  is actually a man, despite having a girls name, so do not speak to him... and never accept sweets off him... he's a baddie!
    10/  Avoid anything with 2 stars... Hotels, restaurants, football shirts... 
     
  21. Clap
    ilkleyram got a reaction from jono in Pastinaak's many failures   
    What in God's holy name are you worried about? You've sorted his 18th birthday present of antique top from our promotion year, you've successfully made sure that you will never, ever be asked to go shopping again for the kids' birthday present and your 8 year old will soon be playing with the box/paper from his other presents. And, to boot, you've got a story to tell.
    You millenials.................
  22. Like
    ilkleyram got a reaction from SKRam in Thoughts!   
    Just a thought 
    That was Sir Brian's third season at Derby. Perhaps we should allow Phillip the same time. 
    And just another thought.
    The criticism received by Sir Brian after his first full season at Derby was similar to some of the stuff being directed at Phillip now 
     
  23. Like
    ilkleyram got a reaction from LeedsCityRam in Thoughts!   
    Just a thought 
    That was Sir Brian's third season at Derby. Perhaps we should allow Phillip the same time. 
    And just another thought.
    The criticism received by Sir Brian after his first full season at Derby was similar to some of the stuff being directed at Phillip now 
     
  24. Like
    ilkleyram got a reaction from Squid in Thoughts!   
    Just a thought 
    That was Sir Brian's third season at Derby. Perhaps we should allow Phillip the same time. 
    And just another thought.
    The criticism received by Sir Brian after his first full season at Derby was similar to some of the stuff being directed at Phillip now 
     
  25. Clap
    ilkleyram got a reaction from 86 Schmokes & a Pancake in Thoughts!   
    Just a thought 
    That was Sir Brian's third season at Derby. Perhaps we should allow Phillip the same time. 
    And just another thought.
    The criticism received by Sir Brian after his first full season at Derby was similar to some of the stuff being directed at Phillip now 
     
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